Closing Parks is Bad for Business

It’s Memorial Day weekend, but with park closures looming, we aren’t looking forward to the unofficial start of summer as much as usual. Neither is a group of businesses that has formed a coalition to oppose the closure of state parks. These folks know that park closures will negatively impact California’s economy (not to mention put a damper on future Memorial Days).

That’s why the coalition representing over 10,000 businesses throughout California urged the governor in a letter today to continue funding the parks for the good of the state’s economic well being. Read the letter here.

Organizations that oppose the closure of state parks include:

  •     California Association of Bed and Breakfast Inns
  •     California Hotel & Lodging Association
  •     California Ski Industry Association
  •     California Travel Association
  •     San Francisco Travel Association
  •     Southwest California Legislative Council
  •     El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce
  •     Lake Elsinore Valley Chamber of Commerce
  •     Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority
  •     Murrieta Chamber of Commerce
  •     Regional Black Chamber of Commerce of San Fernando Valley (RBCC)
  •     Santa Clara Chamber of Commerce & Convention-Visitor’s Bureau
  •     Simi Valley Chamber of Commerce
  •     Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce
  •     Wildomar Chamber of Commerce
  •     Palm Springs Desert Resort Communities Convention and Visitors Authority
  •     San Luis Obispo County Visitors & Conference Bureau
  •     Santa Cruz County Conference and Visitors Council

“Closing Parks is Bad for Business” sign spotted at Cafe Aquatica in Jenner

Why are they supporting state parks? Because parks generate more than $6 billion in economic benefit to the state as a whole. More than 65 million visits are made to state parks annually and average park visitors spend $42 per day on items related to their park visit. This spending supports an estimated 56,000 jobs across the state; jobs that translate into a total labor income of $2.3 billion each year, which is recirculated in local economies. 48 of California’s 58 counties are home to state parks and depend on revenues generated by park support and visitation.

“Closing Parks is Bad for Business” sign spotted at Benzinger Winery in Sonoma

Thank you to these businesses for recognizing the importance of state parks to California and for stepping up on their behalf.  If you own a business and would like to get involved with the coalition, please visit our Save Our State Parks website.

The Closing Parks is Bad for Business Campaign is a targeted effort of the Save Our State Parks Campaign, a grassroots campaign managed by CSPF in partnership with organizations, businesses, local governments, and individuals around the state, that aims to highlight the impacts of park closures on businesses throughout California. 

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2 thoughts on “Closing Parks is Bad for Business

  1. My husband and I spent last weekend in the Mendocino area, where there is a clear connection between state parks and the local economy, which is largely tourism based. The May 2011 closure list slated 8 of the Mendocino area’s 16 state parks for closure – a hard hit for the county. Fortunately, the communities are rallying and some are nearing official word on a reprieve – also made possible thanks to the work of the California State Parks Foundation. Thank you! I am writing a series of blog posts to follow the state parks crisis and my most recent one covers the Mendocino area parks with a spotlight on Russian Gulch – a gem of a park that spans dramatic ocean bluffs to a rhododendron and fern filled canyon that culminates with a waterfall. California State Parks realizes that they cannot close that park to public access because it has received Land and Water Conservation Fund monies, so many liken the situation to “abandonment.”

    What is the future of Mendocino area state parks? Part I: Russian Gulch – http://bit.ly/JAjUbp

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