Thanksgiving week in Big Basin Redwoods State Park!

Big Basin Redwoods State Park is California’s oldest State Park, established in 1902. This park features ancient coast redwoods that are among the tallest and oldest trees on Earth. These California trees can reach higher than 320 feet, and their trunks can grow more than 27 feet wide. And these trees can live for more than 2,000 years! In this park you can enjoy spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, lush waterfalls, more than 80 miles of roads and trails, and a fascinating natural and cultural history. Here are some events to check out this week!

Thanksgiving Day, November 26

All hikes start at Park Headquarters

Redwood Grove Loop Walk – 11 am and 2 pm, 0.5 mi
A 0.5 mile stroll through a magnificent old growth redwood forest. See the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90 minute walk.

The Road Less Traveled – A Dog-Friendly Walk – 9:30 am, 3 mi
On North Escape Road, a paved road closed to traffic. A three mile, two hour round trip walk with a docent. See stunning old-growth redwood groves along beautiful Opal Creek. With a discussion about redwood ecology and park history.

 

Black Friday, November 27

All hikes start at Park Headquarters

Meteor Trail Hike – 10:30 am, 6 mi
A docent will be leading a hike that features mountain streams, oak woodlands, chaparral and redwoods. There will be a discussion of forests, flowers and fires on a six mile, 3.5 hour hike.

Redwood Grove Loop Walk – 11 am and 2 pm, 0.5 mi
A 0.5 mile stroll through a magnificent old growth redwood forest. See the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90 minute walk.

Coffee Talk and Crafts – 9 am to Noon
The Sempervirens Room next to Park Headquarters will have free coffee or hot chocolate. A docent will be there to answer any questions. There will also be a craft activity got kids!

 

Saturday, November 28

All hikes start at Park Headquarters

The Road Less Traveled – A Dog-Friendly Walk – 9:30 am, 3 mi
On North Escape Road, a paved road closed to traffic. A three mile, two hour roundtrip walk with a docent. See stunning old-growth redwood groves along beautiful Opal Creek. With a discussion about redwood ecology and park history.

Redwood Grove Loop Walk – 11 am and 2 pm, 0.5 mi
A 0.5 mile stroll through a magnificent old growth redwood forest. See the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90 minute walk.

 

Sunday, November 29

All hikes start at Park Headquarters

Redwood Grove Loop Walk – 11 am and 2 pm, 0.5 mi
A 0.5 mile stroll through a magnificent old growth redwood forest. See the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90 minute walk.

Art, Books and Coffee – 9:30 am to 12:30 pm
In the beautiful redwood Sempervirens Room, choose a book or two to read with your family, while sipping coffee, tea or hot chocolate next to a roaring fire. There will be a docent available to help you find the perfect book for your family to enjoy, answer your questions about the park and provide an artful craft for your children.

 

Photos: Redwood photos by Sean Peck. Sign photo by Charles Tu

Pigeon Point Lighthouse Celebrated!

Every November people from near and far gather at Pigeon Point Light Station State Park to mark the anniversary of the first time—in 1872—its Fresnel Lens was lit to guide mariners. A technological marvel, even by today’s standards, the first order Fresnel Lens stands 16 feet tall, 6 feet in diameter, and weighs 2,000 pounds. Though the lens is now on display in the adjacent Fog Signal Building, the lighthouse remains an active U.S. Coast Guard aid to navigation.

After 143 years of weathering wind, salt water and other harsh elements, the lighthouse is closed for a major rehabilitation project led by CSPF. Phase One, an interim stabilization of the tower by removing the lens and sealing all cracks to prevent water intrusion, has been completed. Drawings for the remaining three phases (upper tower, lower tower, oil house) are pending approval and a series of events to kick off the restoration campaign are in the works.

The lens will not return to the upper tower until repairs are completed, but that didn’t stop the festivities enjoyed by over 1,000 attendees on Saturday. During the day, families took docent-led nature and history walks, children made their own lighthouses while sipping hot chocolate, musicians serenaded the crowds with songs about lighthouses, Beyond the Border food truck served up delicious meals, and everyone stopped by the Fog Signal Building for viewings of the magnificent lens and its prisms of light.

Shortly after sunset, an audience gathered for a slide show of the construction drawings by Architectural Resources Group (ARG) which were projected onto the lighthouse itself. Then a short video entitled “It’s A Long Way to Pigeon Point” (by docents Stuart Nafey and Peter Bohacek) described historic transportation modes used to reach the lighthouse, as well as marine mammals and birds that migrate past the area.

After the two showings, other images were projected onto the spectacular lighthouse screen—including a lava lamp which only audience members of a certain generation could identify. Using the lighthouse as the backdrop for these two viewings was quite a spectacle. The volunteers at Pigeon Point plan to do it again next year, so save the date of November 12, 2016.

Photos by James Zhang