Huge Step Forward for Land and Water Conservation Fund

Wilder Ranch by Stanislav Sedov via Flickr.jpg

Wilder Ranch State Park in Santa Cruz. Photo by Stanislav Sedov via Flickr

Great news today for the protection of our open spaces.

Yesterday, the U.S. Senate passed a permanent authorization for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), after the previous one expired last fall. This is a huge step forward. In fact, on the way to passage, a damaging amendment was voted down summarily. The House has already passed a bill and the two bills will be taken up in conference committee and reconciled.

The battle to get reauthorization of Land and Water Conservation has been hard fought over the last year. And the fight to ensure that adequate funding moved into LWCF has been going on for much longer. CSPF has participated in the Land and Water Conservation Fund Coalition, a very large coalition effort to speak up on behalf of full funding and more recently the reauthorization, helping as need be, with the California delegation. You may remember we collected letters from Californians in late 2015 for this purpose.

The LWCF is the single largest federal source of funding for conservation in the United States. It is funded from off-shore oil and gas royalties, and was intended to fund $900 million in conservation projects annually. Although it has rarely hit that mark of funding, it has done enormous good anyway with thousands of projects funded here in California, in state parks, in particular, but all of the parks systems the state hosts.

The steps ahead are not certain but this is such an important milestone that we wanted to share the good news.

You can read today’s press release from the Coalition here: LWCF Coalition Statement – Senate Energy Bill Final.

Let’s keep up the good work!

 

Study Reveals Most Americans Care About Environment

“How many Americans are using environmental information to make everyday decisions?”

The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) commissioned a groundbreaking national study to measure environmental behavior and attitudes. The results provide NEEF a baseline for its vision that by 2022, 300 million Americans actively use environmental knowledge to ensure the well-being of the earth and its people.

Survey highlights include:

  • Six out of ten American adults take some sort of action when learning about the environmental issues facing the world
  • 61% of adults visited a park or nature center in the last 12 months.
  • 52% of adults consider zoos, nature centers and parks as trustworthy sources for environmental problems and issues.
  • 77% of adults turn the lights off when leaving a room.
  • 9% of adults compost.
  • 59% of adults consider an environmentally conscious lifestyle a lot of work.

 The research surveyed 1,500 individuals between 18 and 74 years of age with demographics in balance with the U.S. Census.

 Find out more information about NEEF and this survey.